Tag Archives: Super Soul Sunday

God (by any name), the Soul, Religion, and Spirituality

I am fed by Super Soul Sunday on the OWN channel. There have been countless spiritual leaders who have touched me by sharing their thoughts  with Oprah.

In this broadcast they are sharing their beliefs about many of life’s questions.

Definition of God

Several speakers defined God as Love.

Wayne Dyer

God is the highest place within each and every one of us.

Michael Singer

The indwelling consciousness.

Our Source

Deepak Chopra

God is infinite creativity. Infinite compassion. The evolutionary impulse of the universe.

What is the difference between spiritual and religious?

Ilanya Van Zant

Religion is the rules, regulations, ceremonies and rituals developed by man to develop conformity and uniformity in the approach to God.

Spirituality is God’s call to your soul.

DeVon Franklin

I think that religion is the structure for spirituality I think that spirituality can exist even outside of religion but I do believe that most religions came to be because they wanted to help people understand how to navigate this life from a spiritual standpoint.

Can you be spiritual and not religious? Absolutely!

Can you be religious and not spiritual? Absolutely! Unfortunately.

What is the Soul?

Eckhart Tolle

The consciousness that you are, beyond form.

Wayne Dyer

The soul is the birthless, deathless, changeless part of us; the part of us that looks out from behind our eyes and has no form.

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

The soul is the divine part of our self. It is our divine nature. It is a part of us that is one with God.

Jean Houston

The soul is the essence of who and what we are. It is the lure of our becoming.

What do I believe?

Michael Singer

I believe in the divinity inside of every single human being.

. . .

Isn’t it all fascinating? This journey?

The Student

P. S. I wish Rev. Ed Bacon had been included.

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Filed under Deepak Chopra, Dr. Wayne Dyer, Super Soul Sunday

An Acknowledgement of Prayer

I was raised in a fundamentalist Christian church.  Although my parents were broadminded and spiritual, there wasn’t a lot of latitude within their belief system for the ways in which we practiced their chosen faith.  I strayed from that straight and narrow many years ago.

I have explored many beliefs and have formed my unique spiritual path.  And I got religion again when I heard Rainn Wilson on Super Soul Sunday.

I found his discussion of the Baha’i faith fascinating and enlightening.  Yet one precept washed me in such contentment that I can feel my spirit soar with the resonance of it.

Art is prayer.

When we create we are close to God.

Lifting the paintbrush, typing on the keys, moving plants in the garden…I knew it all felt perfect.  Yet had I never thought of it as prayer.

“Talking to God” is trapped in my childhood memories as something very different.

Prayers in church were long and boring and required me to keep my eyes closed and sometimes even to stand up while a long-winded minister or member of the congregation went off on a litany of either thanksgiving or entreaty that meant nothing to me.

Prayers before bed were a ritual of “Please bless…” everyone from my grandparents in Indiana to the orphans in China, which I rattled off by rote.  If I was stumped for enough words I could always please my parents by invoking help in being a better child.

Perhaps I’m telling too much on myself when I say that even prayers before meals were not mindful thoughts of where this food came from, who made it possible, and my good fortune in having it; but more standard recitations of, “Bless this food to our good…”

Gardening is not my new religion, nor is Baha’i.  But I more easily comprehend that the spiritual blessings I receive from my soil are a conversation with my Source.

Amen.

This post was originally written for and published on Vision and Verb on June 25, 2012.

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Filed under Baha'i, Super Soul Sunday

Listening with the Heart

Thich Nhat Hanh is talking on Super Soul Sunday about Deep Listening as a relief for suffering.

Such a beautiful concept.  It is the perfect cure for my normal “Quick to Fix” attitude.

The only time I ever practiced this…and it was purposeful and difficult…was with my mother in her last years.  Why haven’t I remembered how effective that was?

Mother had difficulty in letting go of the pain of her divorce from my father.  After 40+ years she still talked about it incessantly.  I was so tired of hearing it.  At the same time, she complained that no one listened to her.

No matter how many times I tried to relieve her suffering by offering every word of wisdom I could summon, she continued to talk.  I dreaded every visit with her and always left feeling disgruntled and irritated. Ultimately, I told her that I didn’t want to hear anymore.  I cut her off when she would begin.

Then came a time in my life (way too late) when I determined that I should be treating my mother in a way that I must treat a mother if I were to be the person I wanted to be.

On my next visit, I let her know that she could talk to me about anything and I wouldn’t object.  And (finally acknowledging futility) I determined that I would never offer her solutions or opinions.  I would simply listen.

It was excruciating.  It was boring.  At times it was depressing and overwhelming.

And over her last years our relationship changed.  I developed compassion for her.  She was light-hearted when we were together.  Although she admitted her incapacity to love deeply, she expressed her love for me and shared thoughts and memories about herself that I had never heard.

Thank you, Thich Nhat Hanh for reminding me of this profound way to manifest love.

The Student

This post was written for and originally posted on Vision and Verb on June 4, 2012

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Filed under Buddhism, Step 4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves., Step 5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs., Super Soul Sunday, The energy we put into the world comes back to us, Thich Nhat Hanh, You Become What You Believe